Select Page

Inspired by the Joyce Meyer Sermon– How Your Mind Affects Your Walk with God

This entire blog post is sermon-inspired, but I thought it was such an important message that I put in my own two cents. I can say without reserve that my mind has affected my walk with God more times than I could ever count.

What do you think that God thinks about you?

I can admit that I’ve had several misconceptions regarding how God feels about me. I can remember times when I scoffed at the thought of prayer, because I felt like the Lord was probably so sick of me by now. I had been struggling repeatedly with lustful sins, evil thoughts about people, and doubts about the authenticity of God, so it felt hypocritical to then turn and pray. I had convinced myself that God hated me. He was frustrated that I was still failing and falling victim to my fleshly desires, and there was no way I could ask him for forgiveness, again.

What’s funny about that was that I could see how He was so full of grace and mercy for everyone else’s sins, yet I couldn’t fathom that he could do the same for me. And so I would go days, sometimes weeks without getting into his presence and the further I drifted away, the worse I would feel day in and day out.

None of that changed until I learned to accept something that seems so simple, yet also feels unbelieve.

That God simply doesn’t think bad thoughts about me.

When Joyce Meyer said that in her sermon, I’ll be honest, I sneered at the notion, but I was curious. Could it be backed up with scripture? Was this a biblical truth, or just something that was being said to make me feel better?

See, I’m the kind of person who always needs to see the scriptural proof before I allow myself to believe or be comforted by anything any spiritual leader or teacher says. Maybe that makes me difficult, but if I can’t prove it to myself with scripture, I don’t feel good about living my life believing it.

So, I went searching.

In Matthew 15:19 the Bible says, “for out of the heart come evil thoughts…” The feeling of being hated by God definitely fits in the category of “evil thoughts.” And the bible says that God is good, and In Mark 10:18, Jesus says that no one is good except God alone. So if God is good, His heart is good which means he is not a God who thinks evil thoughts.

To prove this point further, 2 Peter 3:9 says that, “he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance.”

Follow me, I promise I’m going somewhere with this.

So, God doesn’t want me to perish (complete ruin or destruction) no matter how many times I mess up. He wants me to come to repentance (sincere remorse), and he is patient (able to tolerate delays without becoming annoyed.

Lo and behold, I found several scriptures that through the Spirit showed me that God is simply not a God who is thinking that any of us are hopeless no matter how many times we mess up.

What do you think about yourself?

Joyce Meyer asked such a profound question in her sermon, How Your Mind Affects Your Walk with God.

“Have you ever thought about what you’re thinking about?”

It’s crazy that many of the things I believed God thought about me were actually what I thought about myself. I was imposing my own beliefs, and my own shame on God when the truth of the matter was that I was upset with myself.

I was frustrated that I wasn’t like that other Christian girl who seemed to have it all together. I had unforgiveness, I was lustful, I thought bad things about people all the time. And because I committed these sins, I believed I wasn’t good enough to be a real Christian.

I worried that if I hadn’t gotten it right by now that I’ll probably never get it right and that left me feeling disheartened and like I was doomed to end up in Hell.

The lies that I believed about myself wouldn’t allow me to accept his forgiveness.

It’s a bad place to be in, when you feel hopeless.

I didn’t realize that the Bible says, “many are the afflictions [troubles] of the righteous, but the Lord delivers him out of them all. He keeps all his bones; not one of them is broken.” (Psalm 34:19-20) And Jeremiah 29:11 says, that God has plans to give me a future and a hope. The Bible also says in 1 Corinthians 10:13 that, “no temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man.” And in Luke 1:37 “for nothing will be impossible with God.”

There are so many scriptures that disproved my belief that I was condemned. When I went searching, I found countless encouraging scriptures to help me in my time of hopelessness, yet because I was unaware of how God really felt about me I allowed the enemy to use my mind as his playground and impose my thoughts on God.

The Enemy uses your mind to affect your walk with God

The truth of the matter is while we as Christians do everything in our power to abstain from sin, sin is in our very nature, and without God there is no way we could ever resist our flesh. The wars within us are between the Spirit and the flesh (Galatians 5:16-18) and the enemy wants you to believe that God expects you to do it all on your own— without the help of his gift to us (the Holy Spirit).

God is not like people, he’s not looking at us and he’s never irritated by the amount of times we ask him for help. We don’t annoy God and in fact he enjoys us being in his presence. The more you spend time in God’s presence the stronger your Spirit becomes, and it is the strength of the Spirit that allows you to overcome your fleshly desires. I think it’s so important to really understand what we think about how God sees us because nine times out of 10 our thinking is flawed.

It wasn’t until hearing this sermon by Joyce Meyer did I realize that I allowed the Enemy to use my sin, the very thing that Jesus died for, the thing that God forgives and never remembers, to keep me apart from God.

See, I underestimated the enemy (trust and believe a blog on this topic is coming up). I underestimated his ways of deceit, treachery, and trickery. And I truly believe the number one area that he attacks me and probably many of my fellow Christian women in is our minds!

He wants us to think that God sees us as bad people and he wants us to think that unless we’re perfect we can’t come to God and we can’t ask for forgiveness of the same sin repeatedly. He tells us lies like, “you need to clean yourself up before you come to God.” But I’ve discovered that it’s only through His Spirit that is in us, that we receive get the strength to overcome. (Ephesians 3:16)

So, I’m wondering what are you thinking about? What do you think God thinks about you?  Let’s take an honest assessment. Meet me in the comments and let’s talk about it.